Our Cardiovascular theme’s research addresses the challenges of cardiovascular disease, the most frequent cause of death in the UK.

Through novel inter-disciplinary and integrative approaches we work to advance the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chronic heart failure and its underlying causes. We do this by:

  • Undertaking Experimental Medicine studies to better define disease mechanisms and develop novel therapies, employing both bench to bedside and reverse translation strategies;
  • Developing and applying precision medicine approaches across biomarkers, deep phenotyping and new diagnostsics;
  • Developing and applying advanced precision therapeutics focussing on novel devices and invasive therapies linked with our Imaging Theme.

Unparalleled environment for translational cardiovascular research

Our existing national and international collaborations, multi-disciplinary expertise, state of the art facilities within the BRC Experimental Medicine Hub and a dedicated CV CRF, enable us to undertake translational research in cardiovascular disease encompassing experimental medicine, precision medicine and advanced therapeutics for the benefit of patients globally.

Within our unparalleled environment for early translational research, created through the integration and alignment of clinical and academic activities, our Cardiovascular research activity falls under four programmes:

  • Programme 1: Experimental Medicine – Novel therapeutic targets
  • Programme 2: Experimental Medicine – Novel disease mechanisms and pathophysiology
  • Programme 3: Precision Medicine – Biomarkers and diagnostics
  • Programme 4: Advanced Therapeutics – Devices and advanced therapy

Successes

With an outstanding track record of translating research findings into health benefits for patients our successes include:

  • Improving the diagnostic performance of genetic tests for heart muscle disease
  • Improving the measurement and treatment of hypertension
  • Developing and testing inhibitors of p38 for ischaemic heart disease.